Future weather control: no more storms, earthquakes, tsunamis

May 29 2008 / by futuretalk / In association with Future Blogger.net
Category: Environment   Year: General   Rating: 14 Hot

By Dick Pelletier

In just ninety seconds, the Great Kanto Earthquake destroyed Japan’s economy in 1923 throwing the country into chaos. Instability opened the door for a military government, which quickly led to war in Southeast Asia, then to WWII, dishing out unimaginable horrors to the world.

Could a 1923 disaster repeat itself? What if the Southern California “Big One”, forecast for years by experts, actually happened and 16 million people suddenly found their homes submerged in the Pacific Ocean? Could an event like this destroy the American economy, and how would that affect the rest of the world?

Property losses from violent weather are increasing. The recent Myanmar cyclone and China earthquake have both caused huge losses in lives, weakened economies and devastated areas. Everyone enjoys nature’s breathtaking beauty and we could not exist without its bounty, but sometimes this Earth we call home can be harsh and unforgiving.

Forward-thinking scientists believe current knowledge of weather modification, combined with our newest wonder science – molecular nanotechnology – will one day provide an opportunity for humanity to inoculate itself against natural disasters.

Geologists describe earth’s atmosphere as an envelope of air, rotating with the continents and oceans; receiving enormous amounts of energy from the Sun’s radiation, which powers weather events. Typical energy expended in a tornado funnel is equal to about fifty kilotons of explosives; a thunderstorm exchanges about ten times this much during its lifetime; and a moderate size Atlantic hurricane can build up to more than 1,000 megatons of energy. (cont.)

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Robots Rescue and Fix Trapped Victims

September 26 2008 / by John Heylin / In association with Future Blogger.net
Category: Technology   Year: 2017   Rating: 5 Hot

October 16th, 2017, 02:12 The dreaded happens.

A 8.1 magnitude quake rocks the San Francisco Bay Area. The San Francisco side of the Bay Bridge partially collapses, taking some cars returning to the east bay after a night at the bars into the waters below. The new Oakland span, finished less than a year before, weathers the quake with only minor structural damage. The buildings in San Francisco don’t fair as well.

For Harrison Thomas, the only thing he remembered was that the walls were shaking right before the floor of his apartment suddenly disappeared.

Responders on the scene did a quick survey of the scene and deploy snake-like robots to search for survivors. After twelve minutes Harrison Thomas is found wedged between the flooring of the second and third floor. A piece of wood has speared his leg, pinning him in place.

The crew at the scene uses the robots diamond-edged belt saw to carefully saw their way through the wood in order to aid in his removal. A doctor from St. Louis, on call since the disaster, views the proceedings from his local hospital. Seeing Harrison’s body, he determines that a surgery must be made before the rescue crews get to him in order to save his leg.

Morphine is injected into his leg in preparation for the surgery. UV sterilized tools, located inside the snake, are manipulated over a secure wireless connection to repair the neural and vascular damage done to his leg. Hours later, crews finally unearth Harrison and take him to a mobile hospital set up in a warehouse at Pier 5.

Without this technology, he would have lost his leg, possibly even died.

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